Zum Besuch der EUFIC-Homepage hier klicken
Lebensmittelsicherheit & Qualität
Food Risk Communication
Gesundheit & Lebensstil
Ernährungsbedingte Krankheiten
Consumer Insights
(Nur in Englisch)
Food for thought
(Nur in Englisch)
Im Rampenlicht
Energy Balance

Diese Web Seite ist von der Health On the Net Stiftung akkreditiert: Klicken Sie, um dies zu überprüfen Wir befolgen den HONcode Standard für vertrauensvolle Gesundheitsinformationen.
Kontrollieren Sie dies hier.

Science Briefs

Unter dieser Rubrik stellen wir wissenschaftliche Publikationen und Forschungsergebnisse aus Europa und dem Rest der Welt vor, die für EUFIC-Leser interessant sein könnten. Falls nicht anders angegeben, war EUFIC nicht an der Forschung beteiligt.


Researchers from the Wageningen University in the Netherlands found that thinking in black and white terms when it comes to food (e.g. thinking of foods as either “good or bad”) can partly explain why the tendency to consciously control food intake is associated with more weight regain. People who follow a rigid “all or nothing” diet approach may be more likely fail to stick with their diet and tend to regain weight in the long-term.


A team of researchers from Canada conducted a large study on the health effects of both saturated and trans fatty acid consumption. They combined data from 70 previously conducted observational studies and looked at the associated roles of these fatty acids in increasing the risk of death, cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. Overall findings suggested that eating higher amounts of saturated fat was not associated with an increased risk in comparison to lower amounts for these health outcomes. The consumption of higher amounts of trans fat was associated with an increased risk. The authors are cautious drawing conclusions and point to methodological limitations of the included studies and to the fact that these observational studies cannot provide evidence for a cause and effect relationship. Moreover, they warn that one must carefully consider the effects of alternative foods before amending dietary guidelines for saturated and trans fatty acids.


American researchers from Saint Louis University in St. Louis, Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, and Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, have concluded that, in sedentary, overweight women and men, the combination of calorie restriction (eating fewer calories than normally consumed) and exercise has additive effects on the regulation of blood sugar levels after a meal. The effect is greater than obtained by either calorie restriction or exercise alone, with the same percentage of weight loss. Moreover, the time required to reach the intended weight loss was significantly shorter when combining the two interventions.


On 4 June 2015, the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) released its scientific opinion on acrylamide in food. The conclusion was that based on evidence from animal studies, dietary exposure to acrylamide potentially increases the risk of developing cancer for consumers in all age groups. Acrylamide forms particularly in plant-based, carbohydrate-rich foods during high temperature cooking (usually above 120 °C) as a consequence of the Maillard reaction. The Maillard reaction is a reaction between a reducing sugar and an amino acid that results in the “browning” and characteristic flavours of certain foods, cooked at high temperatures. Besides these sensory changes, the Maillard reaction can also result in the formation of undesirable substances such as acrylamide.


Researchers from the EPIC study (European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition) found that an increase in physical activity (PA) reduced the risk of mortality, particularly when comparing inactive people with those that were moderately inactive. The researchers concluded that these findings provide evidence that even a small increase in the amount of PA by the most inactive members of society should be encouraged. It has the potential to greatly improve public health-related outcomes.

Anfang | Zurück | 1 / 25 | Weiter | Ende | Weiter zu Seite LOS
EUFIC, das Europäische Informationszentrum für Lebensmittel, ist eine gemeinnützige Organisation, die den Medien, Gesundheits- und Ernährungsfachleuten, Erziehern und meinungsbildenden Einrichtungen wissenschaftlich fundierte Informationen über Nahrungsmittelsicherheit und -qualität sowie Gesundheit und Ernährung auf eine für Konsumenten verständliche Weise liefert.

Letzte Aktualisierung der Website: 16/11/2015
Alle Suchergebnisse anzeigen