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Élelmiszerbiztonság- És Minőség
Élelmiszertechnológia
Food Risk Communication
Táplálkozás
Egészség És Életmód
Étrendfüggő Betegségek
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Science Briefs

A team of researchers from a variety of Italian universities investigated methods of effectively communicating food safety risks to children. The researchers conducted a study in primary schools to evaluate children’s understanding of microorganisms, following either a practical or theoretical teaching approach. After the study, all the children were found to have an improved understanding of microorganisms and their functions. Furthermore, it was found that children who were given the opportunity to actively participate in practical classes were more likely to have a stronger understanding of the context in which microorganisms are found, and their impact on people and the environment.
A case study of digital media strategies of the UK-based Food Standards Agency, by researchers from the FoodRisC project, has revealed that their approach has helped in responding to the public and encouraging education to target audiences on food safety and hygiene issues. Social media has enabled the Food Standards Agency to be more immediate and flexible, especially during a food crisis. This research is an example that other government departments developing similar processes can use in order to create value for the public.
Media use in times of crisis has changed from one-way communication to multi-way interactions since the introduction of social media, such as Twitter, forums and blogs. In a recent paper published in Public Understanding of Science, researchers from the EU funded project FoodRisC (Perceptions and communication of food risk/benefits across Europe), analysed traditional and social media coverage of a food crisis. Using the 2008 Irish dioxin crisis as a case study, they found that social media reported faster and covered fewer topics than traditional media. When looking at the source of information, social media relied mainly on offline and online media news (e.g. BBC or Reuters); whilst, traditional media relied on diverse offline sources, such as experts, politicians or food suppliers. Twitter in particular functioned as a news information disseminator, with almost 90% linking only to newspapers or other media sources.
At the end of last year the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) published its first annual report1 on infectious diseases transmissible from animals to humans (zoonoses) which affect over 380,000 EU citizens per year. Based on this report, at the request of the Council of Ministers of the European Union (EU), EFSA has now for the first time set out a series of scientific conclusions and recommendations and risk communications initiatives to prevent and reduce zoonotic diseases in the EU. The Authority has also identified aspects of the zoonoses reporting system that should be improved.
This paper, commissioned by the ILSI Europe Food Allergy Task Force and published in the peer-reviewed journal Food and Chemical Toxicology, discusses advances in the risk management of allergens which are unavoidably present in food products as a result of cross-contact. The latter may arise for a number of reasons, for instance the presence of residues in inaccessible shared equipment and airborne dust. The conclusion is that precautionary labelling based on quantitative action levels (i.e. maximum levels of unintended allergens above which precautionary labelling is deemed necessary) provides optimal protection for allergic consumers. This is the first paper of a three part series.

 

 

The risk from the unintentional presence of an allergen in a food product must be assessed before it can be managed effectively. Using probabilistic modelling, the risk can be assessed by combining data on the minimum eliciting doses (MEDs) in the allergic human population with exposure data (consumption and contamination data). This paper, commissioned by the ILSI Europe Food Allergy Task Force and published in the peer-reviewed journal Food and Chemical Toxicology,discusses the strengths and limitations of this approach. It is the second paper in a three-part series.
This paper, commissioned by the ILSI Europe Food Allergy Task Force and published in the peer-reviewed journal Food and Chemical Toxicology, outlines a risk analysis framework to underpin decision-making in the area of allergen cross-contact. The latter may arise for a number of reasons, for instance the presence of residues in inaccessible shared equipment and airborne dust. The paper identifies challenges relevant to each component of the risk analysis framework. These are risk assessment, risk management and risk communication. It concludes that risk management decisions must be informed by a clear understanding of the risk assessment’s outputs and limitations. Clear, consistent and trustworthy communications involving all stakeholders underpin these activities. This is the third paper in a three-part series.
The French Agency for Food, Environmental and Occupational Health Safety (ANSES) recently published the findings of a study which considered the risks and benefits associated with seafood consumption and determined the optimum quantity of seafood which should be consumed per week.
Microwaving your chips before you fry them reduces the levels of a cancer-causing substance, reveal findings published today in the SCI’s Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture.
Public health policies should focus on promoting a healthy lifestyle that includes physical activity, fresh fruits and vegetables, and a moderate caloric intake, rather than targeting fructose in the diet. This is the conclusion of two recent publications by researchers from the University of Lausanne, Switzerland, which look at the scientific basis behind claims that fructose is toxic. This Science Brief is based on those publications.
AZ EUFIC-RÓL
Az Európai Élelmiszer Információs Bizottság (EUFIC) egy olyan non-profit szervezet, amely az élelmiszerbiztonság és –minőség, valamint az egészség és táplálkozás kapcsolatáról nyújt tudományon alapuló információkat a médiának, egészség- és táplálkozásügyi szakembereknek, oktatóknak, valamint a közvéleményt formáló személyeknek közérthető formában.

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A webhely utolsó frissítésének dátuma: 23/04/2014
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