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Segurança E Qualidade Alimentar
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Science Briefs

A team of researchers from Canada conducted a large study on the health effects of both saturated and trans fatty acid consumption. They combined data from 70 previously conducted observational studies and looked at the associated roles of these fatty acids in increasing the risk of death, cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease, stroke and type 2 diabetes. Overall findings suggested that eating higher amounts of saturated fat was not associated with an increased risk in comparison to lower amounts for these health outcomes. The consumption of higher amounts of trans fat was associated with an increased risk. The authors are cautious drawing conclusions and point to methodological limitations of the included studies and to the fact that these observational studies cannot provide evidence for a cause and effect relationship. Moreover, they warn that one must carefully consider the effects of alternative foods before amending dietary guidelines for saturated and trans fatty acids.

Dutch researchers from the department of Health Sciences and the EMGO Institute for Health Care Research of VU University, in Amsterdam, and the Division of Human Nutrition of Wageningen University, have published a paper in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, concluding that detrimental effects of industrial trans fatty acids (TFAs) on heart health are beyond dispute and that limiting their intake will likely lower cardiovascular disease (CVD). In addition, effects specific to trans fatty acids that are naturally present in dairy and meat and trans fatty acids produced as supplements for weight loss (conjugated linoleic acid) warrant further study.
Supplementation with the omega-3 fatty acid docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) from algal oil may lower blood triglycerides (TG) and increase both high-density (HDL) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in people without coronary heart disease (CHD). These are the results of a recent meta-analysis by US researchers from the Cleveland Clinic, Harvard School of Public Health, and Brigham and Women’s Hospital.
Eating plant sources of omega-3 fatty acids may be as beneficial for health as eating fish sources of omega-3 fatty acids, suggests a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
The quality of dietary fat intake in infants may be associated with a reduction in total and LDL (bad) cholesterol in early life, especially in girls, suggests a new study published in the European Journal of Clinical Nutrition.
Daily consumption of a handful of Macadamia nuts for five weeks helped individuals with elevated cholesterol to significantly improve their blood lipid and cholesterol profile. These findings support further the previously reported heart-healthy effects of nuts such as walnuts or almonds.

Scientists of the University of Jaen, members of the ‘Peptides and peptidases’ research group of the Faculty of Experimental Sciences, are working on the protective effects exerted by olive oil on an animal model of diabetes and on the role of the different components of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (SRAA). This is the first study of its kind that is carried out in Spain.

Researchers in Sweden have used data from one of the largest databases in the world on dietary intake to identify 25-year trends in diet, cholesterol and body mass index (BMI) among adults living in northern Sweden. The findings hint at the importance of following official dietary guidelines rather than popular diet fashions.
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O European Food Information Council ou EUFIC (Conselho Europeu de Informação Alimentar) é uma organização sem fins lucrativos, que fornece informação científica sobre segurança e qualidade alimentar, nutrição e saúde, aos meios de comunicação, profissionais de nutrição e saúde, educadores e líderes de opinião pública, de uma forma facilmente compreensível pelos consumidores.

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